Translations of basic vocabulary
(Part III, Lines 307-444 of the Shipman's Tale)

 

Here are the glosses for the words on the quiz. Again, if the meaning is obscure even with the gloss, check the lines in the interlinear translation (use the search button on your browser -- Control F in netscape -- and search for the line numbers); then use the back button to return here.
306 He let his lyf, and there I lete hym dwelle.
      (let = ledeth), leads

311 Ne no wight elles, that he nas ful fayn
      was not (nas = ne was) very eager, pleased

316 Have hire in his armes bolt upright
;      flat on (her)back

324 Or where hym list; namoore of hym I seye.
      no more

326 To Seint-Denys he gan for to repaire,
      go, return

339 But for to wite and seen of his welfare,
      know

343 And he hym tolde agayn, ful specially,
      in detail

349 Daun John answerde, "Certes, I am fayn
      happy, pleased

354 Lente me gold; and as I kan and may,
      know how and am able

367 To certeyn Lumbardes, redy in hir hond,
      their

373 His wyf ful redy mette hym atte gate,
      at the

375 And al that nyght in myrthe they bisette
      employed themselves

385 And woot ye why? By God, as that I gesse
      guess

390 By redy token; and heeld hym yvele apayed,
      held (considered) himself ill used, badly treated

403 I kepe nat of his tokenes never a deel;
      care nothing, take to account of . . . not a bit

407 That he hadde yeve it me bycause of yow
      given

422 As be nat wrooth, but lat us laughe and pleye.
      angry

427 This marchant saugh ther was no remedie,
      saw

430 "Now wyf," he seyde, "and I foryeve it thee;
      forgive

432 Keep bet thy good, this yeve I thee in charge."      better

Once again make a list of the words that you did not know and, if you missed a good many, read again lines 307-404 of The Shipman's Tale and then return here to take another test

If you are satisfied that you know most of the words on the list above, return to Lesson 6 Or go to The Geoffrey Chaucer Page | The Index of Translations | The Teach Yourself Chaucer Page. Or use the back button on your browser to return to the previous page.