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| Calendar Archive


Laurie Anderson

Charles Eliot Norton Lecture

Wednesday, April 14 at 5:00 pm
Laurie Anderson
Spending the War Without You: Virtual Backgrounds

Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most renowned – and daring – creative pioneers. Known primarily for her multimedia presentations, she has cast herself in roles as varied as visual artist, composer, poet, photographer, filmmaker, electronics whiz, vocalist, and instrumentalist. Register for a free ticket here.

Anna Schultz

Humanities Center:
Musics Abroad Seminar

Wednesday, April 14 at 7:00 pm
Anna Schultz, University of Chicago
"Between Diasporas: Bene Israel Kirtan in Israel"


Between the 1880s and 1940s, Bene Israel kirtan—a genre combining song, biblical storytelling, and Jewish pedagogy—was the most popular form of Marathi Jewish performance. Enthusiasm for Jewish kirtan waned as Bene Israel people began migrating to Israel in the 1950s and 60s, and it had nearly disappeared by the time it was revived by Indo-Israeli women in the 1990s. This talk explores the revival, regendering, and retranslation of kirtan by Flora Samuel (née Mani Ashtamkar), a teacher and headmistress who became a leader in the Indian Jewish community after migrating from Bombay to Israel in the 1960s. Mrs. Samuel redesigned the performance format of kirtan to resonate with the structure of Indian women’s groups in Israel, regendered it by introducing songs from women’s oral tradition, and retranslated song texts to situate them more firmly in Israeli Indian Jewish life. Her innovations positioned kirtan in a new time and place, bringing the Indian Jewish diaspora home, both literally and metaphorically. REGISTER HERE

Fromm Concert Poster

Fromm Players 2021 Concert


Friday, April 16, 2021 at 8:00 pm
Miranda Cuckson, violin, with Conor Hanick, piano


Co-curated by Miranda Cuckson and Anne Shreffler, the first Fromm Concert of 2021 features works by Natasha Barrett and Rebecca Saunders and the world premieres of pieces written for Cuckson by Dongryul Lee and Jeffrey Mumford. Join us on the department's YouTube or Vimeo channels.

Shreffler is also moderating video interviews with the four composers and the performers, which will premiere on YouTube and Vimeo.

Rebecca Saunders, Duo for violin and piano (1996, rev. 1999)
Jeffrey Mumford, fleeting cycles of layered air for solo violin (2020, world premiere)
Dongryul Lee, A finite island in the infinite ocean (2020, world premiere):
I. Intonazione
II. A finite island in the infinite ocean
Natasha Barrett, Allure and Hoodwink for violin, piano, and electronics (2014)

Yun Emily Wang

Barwick Colloquium

Tuesday, April 20, 2021 at 3:15 pm
Yun Emily Wang, Duke University

Yun Emily Wang is an ethnographer of sound and music with a particular interest in transnational migration. She earned a PhD in ethnomusicology from the University of Toronto in 2018. Her dissertation, “Sonic Poetics of Home and the Art of Making Do in Sinophone Toronto,” situates transnational Chinese imaginaries of “home” within Canadian multiculturalism and examines how ethnic and diasporic subjectivities emerge from the accumulations of everyday sounding and listening practices. Through case studies on queer kinship, aging in a nursing home, and the gendered geography of intimacy, this work also considers how the diaspora intersects with other identifications.


The Parker Quartet

Parker Quartet

Friday, April 23 at 8:00 pm
Blodgett Artists-in-Residence the Parker Quartet present a concert live from Paine Hall on Harvard Music Department's YouTube Channel. Concert site will be active from 8pm on Friday April 23 through Sunday, April 25 at midnight. JOIN US HERE

Joseph Haydn, String Quartet in B Minor, op. 33, no. 1
Thomas Adès, Arcadiana
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Piano Quintet in G Minor, op. 1

Yvette Janine Jackson

Fromm Players 2021 Concert


Friday, April 30, 2021 at 8:00 pm
Yvette Janine Jackson, Roscoe Mitchell, and Imani Uzuri


Harvard professor, composer, and pianist Vijay Iyer is the curator for the second Fromm concert of 2021, on April 30 at 8pm (EDT). The bill includes works by Yvette Janine Jackson, a composer, sound artist, and Harvard professor renowned for her innovative radio operas, Roscoe Mitchell, the virtuosic saxophonist and founder of the Art Ensemble of Chicago, and vocalist and social justice activist Imani Uzuri.

Join us on the department's YouTube or Vimeo channels.

Scroll down for all 2020-2021 listings | Calendar Archive




 


2020 Fall Season



DUE TO HARVARD'S EFFORTS TO COMBAT THE SPREAD OF COVID19, this fall's events will be virtual.


We wish we could be together but look forward to seeing you again as soon as we can.
Information and links will be updated frequently.


Wednesday, September 16 at 7pm
Humanities Center Seminar: Musics Abroad
Richard K. Wolf
(Harvard University)
Free
Richard K. Wolf (Harvard University)
VIRTUAL: Register to join the event here
Film discussion: "Two Poets and a River"
On opposite sides of the Oxus River border between Tajikistan and Afghanistan live two poet-singers who share a common language, faith, and family network, and yet remain separated by vicissitudes of the Great Game, the 19th-century conflict between the British Empire and Czarist Russia. Ethnomusicologist Richard Wolf has been contemplating the rupture that exists across this divide in “Two Poets and a River,” a film in progress about poet-singers Qurbonsho in Tajikistan and Daulatsho in Afghanistan. Read more here.

Wednesday, September 16 at 9:00 pm
Prof. Claire Chase hosts
a VIRTUAL Throwdown
Free and open to all.
JOIN THE EVENT HERE (password 948399)

Tuesday September 22, 2020 at 3:15pm
Barwick Colloquium Series
Nick Seaver (Tufts University): Overwhelmed, Alone, Uncool: Visions of the Listener in Algorithmic Recommendation
JOIN THE EVENT HERE (password 408845)
Free and open to all.

Tuesday, September 29, 2020
Barwick Colloquium
Ashon Crawley (UVA)
Notes for a Cassette: The Hammond Organ and Blackqueer Gathering
“It occurs in the music. From attempting to figure out which R&B singer is gay to which rapper has queer relations, music is the place of unsettled sexualities. To ask why are the choir directors, and maybe musicians too, all gay is to ask what occurred such that music has become the place in black sociality in which blackqueerness is a question, is a problem, worth thinking about. In this lecture I present some of my ongoing research about the Hammond organ, black spiritual sociality and blackqueer possibility. I will discuss the recording technology of the cassette tape and two church boys in love named Brian and William.”
JOIN THE EVENT HERE (password: 934032)
Free and open to all.

Wednesday, October 14 at 7pm
Humanities Center Seminar: Musics Abroad
Katherine Lee
(UCLA)
Zoom link and details to come.
Free and open to all.

Friday, October 16 at 8:15pm ET
STREAMING on Harvard Music Department YOUTUBE channel [link will become active at 8:00pm]
The Parker Quartet from Paine Hall, LIVE
Bartok String Quartet No. 3
Brahms String Quartet in C minor, Op. 51 No. 1

Event will be available through Sunday, October 18th at midnight.
Free and open to all.

Tuesday, October 20, 2020 at 3:15pm
Barwick Colloquium Series
Naomi Andre (University of Michigan)
JOIN THE EVENT HERE (password 893967)
Free and open to all.

Wednesday, October 21 at 9:00 pm
Prof. Claire Chase hosts
a VIRTUAL Throwdown
Free and open to all.
Watch on YOUTUBE

Tuesday, November 17 at 3:15 pm
Barwick Colloquium Series
Thomas Ankersmit, musician and sound artist: "Experimenting and Composing with the Serge Modular Synthesizer."
JOIN THE EVENT HERE (password 754321)
Free and open to all.

Wednesday, November 18 at 7pm
Humanities Center Seminar: Musics Abroad
Ulrike Präger
(Paris Lodron University of Salzburg): "(Co-) Performing Post-Migration in Germany"
VIRTUAL: Link to more information and registration: https://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/event/co-performing-post-migration-germany
Free and open to all.

Wednesday, November 18 at 9pm
Prof. Claire Chase hosts
a VIRTUAL Throwdown
Free and open to all.
Watch on YOUTUBE

Tuesday, November 24, 2020
Barwick Colloquium
Alicia Lola Jones (Indiana University): "God Don't Need No Matches, He's Fire All By Himself: Musical Masculinities and The Art of Enflaming Worship"
Jones is Assistant professor in the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology and the author of Flaming? The Peculiar Theopolitics of Fire and Desire in Black Male Gospel Performance
JOIN HERE [password 397227]
Free and open to all.

Thursday, December 3 at 11am
Premiere Performance of Lisa E. Harris Commission
Virtual
“A BLACK WOMAN TOLD ME AND I BELIEVE HER. A MOVEMENT” (2020), commissioned by Claire chase for the students of her seminar, Community Building and Social Justice Through Music. For 16 voices, body percussion and mixed instrumental ensemble (two ukuleles, guitars, flute, violin, keyboards and drums).
STREAMING on
Free and open to all. View the performance on Harvard Music Department YOUTUBE channel

Friday, December 4 at 8:15pm
Parker Quartet LIVE STREAMED on Harvard Music Department YOUTUBE channel
Hans Abrahamsen, String Quartet no. 4
Beethoven,
String Quartet in A minor, Opus 132
This event is free and open to anyone.
Event will be available through Sunday, December 6 at midnight.

Friday and Saturday, December 12 at 7pm
HYDRA Concerts

FALL HYDRA: online electroacoustic concert

Saturday, December 12 at 7:00 pm
HYDRA Concerts

Harvard University Studio for Electroacoustic Composition presents an evening of music from a distance. This semester's concert will feature works composed by students of Music 167: Intro to Electroacoustic Music and live performances from Music 179: Improvisation with Live-Electronics. This concert is free and open to all. Please use the following link to attend our audio and video presentation – https://harvard.zoom.us/j/93276760947?pwd=T250SHJjNlVQRjAydWlFazdSMlFqUT09 An audio-only broadcast will stream concurrently at: https://mixlr.com/huseac

Wednesday, December 16 at 7:00 pm
New Student Work Performed by the Parker Quartet
Free and open to all.
Pieces composed by Yvette Janine Jackson's composition students based on works of art in the Harvard Art Museums digital collection.
Live on the Harvard Dept of Music YouTube Channel.


2021 Spring Season

DUE TO HARVARD'S EFFORTS TO COMBAT THE SPREAD OF COVID19, many of this spring's events may be virtual. Please call 617-495-2791 or write musicdpt@fas.harvard.edu with questions or for more information


Saturday, January 30 at 8:00 pm
HRCM AND HBCO: Handel's Messiah
Experience Handel’s Messiah – the timeless story of finding ultimate joy and hope – with the Harvard-Radcliffe Collegium Musicum and Harvard Baroque Chamber Orchestra in a historic all-virtual performance on January 30th at 8pm EST. Our socially conscious performance, informed by a panel discussion with Messiah experts, will also feature filmography, photography, and artwork from Harvard affiliates; solos from Collegium members; and a special appearance from our alumni. As we come together from different corners of the world to unite in love of music, this piece keeps us looking forward to our day of reconnecting amidst our isolation. Please see hrcm.org for our YouTube link, to be released on concert day. After the premiere, you can also view the concert at any time on YouTube.  

Saturday, February 6 at 8:00 pm
RADCLIFFE CHORAL SOCIETY: Uncharted
The Radcliffe Choral Society is excited to present Uncharted, featuring two virtual world premieres: A Sense of Decency and Planetarium. Composed by Dr. Katherine Pukinskis, A Sense of Decency sets excerpts from a dissent and an opinion written by the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Planetarium by Jenny Yao ‘22 brings to life a poem by Radcliffe College alumna Adrienne Rich ‘51, celebrating the work of 18th-century German astronomer Caroline Herschel. The premieres will be accompanied by the Grammy award-winning Parker Quartet, Blodgett Artists-in-Residence at the Harvard University Department of Music. In addition to the virtual recordings, Uncharted will include visual artwork created by singers in the Radcliffe Choral Society and high school students, behind-the-scenes footage of the RCS virtual choir experience this past fall, and introductions from the composers themselves. This presentation will be “uncharted” in several ways; not only will it premiere two pieces written about trailblazing women, but it will also be the Radcliffe Choral Society’s first-ever completely virtual concert. We invite you to join us on YouTube as we share our music through a new medium. The link will be live on the RCS website homepage for your enjoyment on Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 8:00 PM EST.

Wednesday, February 10 at 5:00 pm
CHARLES ELIOT NORTON LECTURE
Laurie Anderson
Spending the War Without You: Virtual Backgrounds
Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most reknowned – and daring – creative pioneers. Known primarily for her multimedia presentations, she has cast herself in roles as varied as visual artist, composer, poet, photographer, filmmaker, electronics whiz, vocalist, and instrumentalist. REGISTER HERE. Streaming on the Mahindra Humanities Center YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, February 10 at 7:00pm
HUMANITIES CENTER: MUSICS ABROAD SEMINAR: Ruth Opara, Columbia University
“African Enough?! Women, Music, and Motherhood in the Diaspora”
Drawing from five years of participation and documentation of the Nigerian, Igbo married women’s music in the USA, this presentation explores how women are engaging and juxtaposing their roles as “dancers” and mothers in the diasporic space. Igbo communities, including Uratta, meet once a year to celebrate Igbo culture and teach the children about their cultural heritage; women’s music is the highlight of the conventions. In this presentation, Opara argues that the popularization of Igbo married women’s music in the 1980s define Igbo women’s dances in the diaspora. As a result, Igbo women in the USA mirror and adopt the Nigerian tenets of motherhood in music performance that might result in a clash. Opara will examine the music performed by Uratta, Owerri women in Washington DC to reveal the factors connecting Igbo women performers at home and in the diaspora. This presentation reveals subtle ways Igbo women negotiate and engage in broader issues about race and ethnicity through their music performance. REGISTER HERE.

Tuesday, February 16 at 3:15 pm
BARWICK COLLOQUIUM: Jonathan De Souza, Western University
De Souza’s research combines music theory, cognitive science, and philosophy, and it examines both classical and popular repertoire. He is particularly interested in questions about music, technology, and embodiment. For example, his book, Music at Hand: Instruments, Bodies, and Cognition, asks how instruments affect music’s sounding organization and players’ experience.

Friday, February 19 through Sunday, Feb. 21
GRADUATE MUSIC FORUM CONFERENCE: To Begin Again: Music, Apocalypse, and Social Change
The 2021 Harvard Graduate Music Forum Conference seeks to examine how music, musicians, sound, and musical objects address apocalyptic concepts and theories, broadly construed. The 2021 Harvard Graduate Music Forum Conference seeks to examine how music, musicians, sound, and musical objects address apocalyptic concepts and theories, broadly construed. Keynote by Jessica Schwartz, UCLA and roundtable members Schwartz, Michael Veal, Yale; Lei Liang, UCSD; Jessica Bissett Perea, UC Davis; and Christa Bentley, OCU. https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/gmf21

Wednesday, March 10 at 7:00 pm
HUMANITIES CENTER: MUSICS ABROAD SEMINAR: Jessica Getman, CSU San Bernardino
"Musical Representations of Diaspora Communities in Science Fiction Media: Star Trek and Defiance"
Science fiction media often relies on binaries—present/future, nature/technology, self/other, and human/alien. For the human and the alien to meet, however, one or both must be displaced (forcefully or voluntarily) from their home. In science fiction, music defines both the human and the alien, becoming a key indicator of diaspora, cultural mobility, and cultural mixture. Music is portable, and that portability connects diasporas in the real world with their homelands and cultures of origin. However, as Kay Kaufman Shelemay tells us, music can also interact with new styles, thereby maintaining the original culture while facilitating derivatives in a new setting. In science fiction, this allows creators to explore how cultures might change through interaction with new environments and alien societies. Music can be a powerful tool in representing diaspora communities in science fiction, as well as in imagining the responses of these communities to their new settings. This presentation teases out the ways that science fiction depicts diaspora communities through diegetic music, specifically comparing the Star Trek franchise (1966–) to the Defiance television series (2013–2015). Star Trek’s representation of displaced communities uses music to connect characters to their homelands and to emphasize their cultural identities. Defiance, on the other hand, is about cultural mixture between diasporic communities, and this series goes further to explore that mixture through the combination of “human” and “alien” musical styles. These two franchises demonstrate two distinct ways in which science fiction media represents the idea of diaspora and the mobility of culture. REGISTER HERE

Friday, March 19 at 8:00 pm
PARKER QUARTET
Blodgett Artists-in-Residence the Parker Quartet present a concert live from Paine Hall on Harvard Music Department's YouTube Channel. Concert site will be active from 8pm on Friday through Sunday, March 21 at midnight. JOIN US HERE
Vijay Iyer, Mozart Effects for String Quartet
Branch Freeman (winner of the Blodgett Composition Prize), Prelude
Florence Price, Five Folksongs in Counterpoint

Tuesday, March 23 at 3:15 pm
BARWICK COLLOQUIUM: Matana Roberts
American sound experimentalist, visual artist, jazz saxophonist and clarinetist, composer, and improviser speaks about her work.

Wednesday, March 24 at 5:00 pm
CHARLES ELIOT NORTON LECTURE
Laurie Anderson
Spending the War Without You: Virtual Backgrounds

Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most reknowned – and daring – creative pioneers. Known primarily for her multimedia presentations, she has cast herself in roles as varied as visual artist, composer, poet, photographer, filmmaker, electronics whiz, vocalist, and instrumentalist. Streaming on the Mahindra Humanities Center YouTube Channel.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021 at 3:15 pm
BARWICK COLLOQUIUM: Bonnie Gordon, University of Virginia
Bonnie Gordon's primary research interests center on the experiences of sound in Early Modern music making and the affective potential of the human voice. Dr. Gordon's Voice Machines: The Castrato, The Cat Piano and Other Strange Sounds uses the castrato as a point of departure for asking several questions about the interrelated histories of music, technology, sound, and the limits of the human body. Another book, Jefferson's Ear closely explores the historical record, especially what is and is not in his music collection. The book focuses on sound, music, and race in two locations: Monticello and New Orleans.

Wednesday, April 14 at 5:00 pm
CHARLES ELIOT NORTON LECTURE
Laurie Anderson
Spending the War Without You: Virtual Backgrounds

Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most reknowned – and daring – creative pioneers. Known primarily for her multimedia presentations, she has cast herself in roles as varied as visual artist, composer, poet, photographer, filmmaker, electronics whiz, vocalist, and instrumentalist. Register for a free ticket here.

Wednesday, April 14 at 7:00 pm
HUMANITIES CENTER: MUSICS ABROAD SEMINAR: Anna Schultz, University of Chicago
"Between Diasporas: Bene Israel Kirtan in Israel"
Between the 1880s and 1940s, Bene Israel kirtan—a genre combining song, biblical storytelling, and Jewish pedagogy—was the most popular form of Marathi Jewish performance. Enthusiasm for Jewish kirtan waned as Bene Israel people began migrating to Israel in the 1950s and 60s, and it had nearly disappeared by the time it was revived by Indo-Israeli women in the 1990s. This talk explores the revival, regendering, and retranslation of kirtan by Flora Samuel (née Mani Ashtamkar), a teacher and headmistress who became a leader in the Indian Jewish community after migrating from Bombay to Israel in the 1960s. Mrs. Samuel redesigned the performance format of kirtan to resonate with the structure of Indian women’s groups in Israel, regendered it by introducing songs from women’s oral tradition, and retranslated song texts to situate them more firmly in Israeli Indian Jewish life. Her innovations positioned kirtan in a new time and place, bringing the Indian Jewish diaspora home, both literally and metaphorically. REGISTER HERE

Friday, April 16, 2021
FROMM PLAYERS 2021 CONCERT
Miranda Cuckson, violin, with Conor Hanick, piano
Co-curated by Miranda Cuckson and Anne Shreffler, the first Fromm Concert of 2021 features works by Natasha Barrett and Rebecca Saunders and the world premieres of pieces written for Cuckson by Dongryul Lee and Jeffrey Mumford. Join on the department's YouTube or Vimeo channels. Cuckson and Shreffler are also moderating a series of video interviews with the composers and pianists, which will premiere on YouTube and Vimeo.
Rebecca Saunders, Duo for violin and piano (1996, rev. 1999)
Jeffrey Mumford, fleeting cycles of layered air for solo violin (2020, world premiere)
Dongryul Lee, A finite island in the infinite ocean (2020, world premiere):
I. Intonazione
II. A finite island in the infinite ocean
Natasha Barrett, Allure and Hoodwink for violin, piano, and electronics (2014)

Tuesday, April 20, 2021 at 3:15 pm
BARWICK COLLOQUIUM: Yun Emily Wang, Duke University
Yun Emily Wang is an ethnographer of sound and music with a particular interest in transnational migration. She earned a PhD in ethnomusicology from the University of Toronto in 2018. Her dissertation, “Sonic Poetics of Home and the Art of Making Do in Sinophone Toronto,” situates transnational Chinese imaginaries of “home” within Canadian multiculturalism and examines how ethnic and diasporic subjectivities emerge from the accumulations of everyday sounding and listening practices. Through case studies on queer kinship, aging in a nursing home, and the gendered geography of intimacy, this work also considers how the diaspora intersects with other identifications.

Friday, April 23 at 8:00 pm
PARKER QUARTET
Blodgett Artists-in-Residence the Parker Quartet present a concert live from Paine Hall on Harvard Music Department's YouTube Channel. Concert site will be active from 8pm on Friday April 23 through Sunday, April 25 at midnight. JOIN US HERE
Joseph Haydn, String Quartet in B Minor, op. 33, no. 1
Thomas Adès, Arcadiana
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Piano Quintet in G Minor, op. 1

Friday, April 30, 2021
FROMM PLAYERS 2021 CONCERT
Yvette Janine Jackson, Roscoe Mitchell, and Imani Uzuri
Harvard professor, composer, and pianist Vijay Iyer is the curator for the second Fromm concert of 2021, on April 30 at 8pm (EDT). The bill includes works by Yvette Janine Jackson, a composer, sound artist, and Harvard professor renowned for her innovative radio operas, Roscoe Mitchell, the virtuosic saxophonist and founder of the Art Ensemble of Chicago, and vocalist and social justice activist Imani Uzuri. Join us on the department's YouTube or Vimeo channels.