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Harvard Courses

  • Core Curriculum
  • Anthropology
  • Government
  • History
  • History of Art and Architecture
  • Music
  • Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
  • The Study of Religion
  • Slavic Languages and Literatures
  • Courses at MIT Available for Cross-Registration

     

    Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences Courses

    Consult Courses of Instruction 1998-99 or the Registrar for confirmation, further information, and final course meeting times and places.

    Core Curriculum

    [Foreign Cultures 17. Thought and Change in the Contemporary Middle East]
    Catalog Number: 8705
    Nur Yalman
    Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 4
    The social and political formation of the countries of the Middle East since the 19th century. Focus on Turkey, Arab countries,
    Israel, and Iran; how both native and non-native social theorists portray the processes of change, tradition, and history. Orientalist, Marxist, and cultural anthropological theorists are juxtaposed; writers such as Gökalp, Shariati, Fanon are to be situated. Topics include Islam and politics; the impact of the West; culture change; revolutionary movements; mystic orders; ethnicity and alienation; "progress."
    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.
     
    [Foreign Cultures 28. The Islamic Tradition]
    Catalog Number: 2463
    William A. Graham, Jr.
    Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 10, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
    An introduction to Islamic civilization with attention to both its unity and diversity across the vast area where it has predominated since the 7th century A.D. Consideration of its origins, formative development, fundamental institutions, religious thought and practice, literary and artistic achievements, and modern situations in selected cultural areas.
    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    Foreign Cultures 70 (formerly Religion 1550). Understanding Islam and Contemporary Muslim Societies
    Catalog Number: 1065
    Ali S. Asani
    Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 12. EXAM GROUP: 5
    Offers an introductory survey of the Islamic world as well as the fundamental concepts and devotional practices of the Islamic faith. Focuses on developing an understanding of the diversity of the Muslim religious worldview and the manner in which it has influenced the political, social, and cultural life of Muslims in various parts of the world, particularly in the modern period. Briefly
    considers the contemporary situation of Muslims as a religious minority in Europe and the United States.
    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.

     

    [Historical Study A-40. The Middle East and Europe since the Crusades: Relations and Perceptions]
    Catalog Number: 5423
    Cemal Kafadar
    Half course (spring term). M., W., at 12, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 5
    Nine centuries of interaction between two neighboring world civilizations centered around the Mediterranean basin. Examines the transformation of the terms of coexistence and competition over time from an asymmetry in favor of the Islamic world to one favoring Europe in terms of power and prestige. Surveys major events and broad patterns of human activity (wars, migrations, conversions, trade, cultural exchange); compares institutions and worldviews; studies the variety of ways in which the two civilizations perceived and imagined each other. Focus on common roots and mutual influences. Analysis of (mis)perceptions as historically constructed cultural categories and of their legacy in the modern world.
    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.
     
    Historical Study A-68. The Making and Remaking of the Modern Middle East
    Catalog Number: 1845
    Edward Roger Owen
    Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
    Examines the political and social history of the Arab countries of the Middle East (including North Africa) as well as Iran, Israel, and Turkey. Provides a basis for the understanding of the politics of the region in the late 20th century. Major themes are the creation and transformation of the modern states and of their political systems in the period since World War I, and the
    transformation of Middle Eastern society during this same period under the impact of colonialism, independence, regional wars, and oil. Attention also paid to theoretical discussions concerning modernization and development, including those which seek to define the role of the state.
    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.
     
    [Literature and Arts B-35. The Age of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent: Art, Architecture, and Ceremonial at the Ottoman Court]
    Catalog Number: 1678
    Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar
    Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 13
    "Golden Age" of Ottoman-Islamic visual culture in the 16th century, with focus on architecture, miniature painting, and the
    decorative arts. The urban transformation of Byzantine Constantinople into Ottoman Istanbul, the formation of an imperial
    architectural style, and artistic contacts with contemporary European and Islamic courts are stressed. Art and architecture of
    Safavid Iran and Mughal India are considered as a comparative backdrop. Themes include the role of centralized court ateliers in propagating canons of taste, the emphasis on decorative arts in a culture that rejected monumental sculpture and painting, and representations of the East by European artists in the Orientalist mode.
    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    Social Analysis 36. Religion and Modernization: Cultural Revolutions and Secularism

    Catalog Number: 2027

    Nur Yalman

    Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 4

    Theoretical studies on major social and ideological changes concerning religion in modern society with special reference to France,

    Russia, repercussions in Asia (Hinduism, Buddhism) and the Middle East (Islam). Changes in intellectual attitudes in France and

    the French Revolution. The Enlightenment, the Russian and Turkish Revolutions, and religious revivalism in Iran are considered.

    Comparative studies from India and Sri Lanka. Marxist and structuralist theories concerning religion are examined in historical

    contexts. Students can specialize in regions and topics.

    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.

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    Anthropology

     

    *Anthropology 329. Archaeology and Ethnography of the Near and Middle East

    Catalog Number: 3787

    Ofer Bar-Yosef 1887, C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky 2387, and Nur Yalman 3780 (on leave spring term)

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    Government

    [Government 1207. Comparative Politics of the Middle East]

    Catalog Number: 5232

    Eva Bellin

    Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13

    Introduction to the politics of the region through the study of regime type in five Middle Eastern countries. Considers the rentier

    patrimonial state in Saudi Arabia, the populist authoritarian state in Egypt, the praetorian exclusionary state in Syria, the (failed)

    consociational democratic state in Lebanon, and the cyclical democratic state in Turkey.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    [Government 1208. The Politics of Islamic Resurgence]

    Catalog Number: 0907

    Eva Bellin

    Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4

    Studies the impact of Islamic resurgence on both international and intranational politics. Explores competing explanations for

    Islamic resurgence (cultural, economic, and political), Islamic movements in comparative perspective (with cases selected

    cross-regionally from Iran and Egypt to Indonesia and France), the ideological content of Islamic revival (and debates over its

    potential conflict with Western notions of democracy, human rights, and gender equality), the successes and failures of Islamic

    revolution, the politics of cultural change, and Islam as supranational movement.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

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    History

    [History 1211b. Byzantine Civilization 900-1453]

    Catalog Number: 4135 Enrollment: Limited to undergraduates.

    ----------

    Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3

    Continues the survey of the Byzantine Empire, covering Byzantine history from the 10th to the 15th century. Topics include the

    10th-century renaissance of Byzantine culture, changes in Byzantine society during the 11th century, the encounter with the

    Crusades and the Italian maritime states, the loss and fragmentation of the empire in the 13th century, and the erosion of the

    Byzantine state before the Turks during the 14th century. Readings concentrate on Byzantine diplomacy, the aristocracy, urban

    and rural life, the economy, art, and literature.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    [History 1353 (formerly History 1251 and 1551). Medieval and Early Modern Russia]

    Catalog Number: 5173

    Edward L. Keenan

    Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 12. EXAM GROUP: 5

    A survey of Muscovite history, 1400-1700, with appropriate attention to Kievan and Mongol periods.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    History 1521. Representing the Other: Conference Course

    Catalog Number: 8309

    Maria N. Todorova

    Half course (spring term). M., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8

    An examination of the theoretical and methodological issues of "alterity," the discourse on the otherness of people, with special

    focus on historical representations of Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean. Catagories like "the Other," identity, representation

    and/or construction, the variety of signifiers of alterity will be researched in their concrete historical manifestations.

     

    History 1861. The History of Demographic Transition in the Middle East

    Catalog Number: 7209

    Philippe Fargues

    Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4

    An examination of population dynamics in the Middle East and North Africa from the beginings of demographic transition to the

    present. The formation and reproduction of the family , health, and the distribution of population will be studied from the angles of

    global and differential dynamics. Will also focus on the construction of scientific knowledge on population issues in the region and

    its historical context.

     

    History 1877a. History of the Near East, 600-1055

    Catalog Number: 1770

    Roy Mottahedeh

    Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1-2:30. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16

    A survey of the history of the Near East and North Africa from the rise of Islam in the 7th century to the Turkish ascendance in

    the mid-11th century. Includes Muhammad and his community, Arab conquests, Umayyads and Abbasids, sectarian movements,

    minority communities, government and religious institutions, relations with Byzantium and the Latin West.

    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.

     

    History 1877b. History of the Near East, 1055-1517: Conference Course

    Catalog Number: 3026

    Roy Mottahedeh

    Half course (spring term). M., 3-5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9

    Surveys history of the Near East from the coming of the steppe peoples to the Ottoman conquest of Egypt. Includes Seljuks,

    Crusades, Mongols, and the fall of the Abbasid caliphate, Mamluks, the development of Mediterranean and Indian Ocean trade,

    and the Timurids and their successors.

    Note: History 1877a helpful, but not required.

     

    [History 1878a. Ottoman State and Society I (1300-1550)]

    Catalog Number: 5471

    Cemal Kafadar

    Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.

    Surveys the emergence of the Ottoman state from a frontier principality into a world empire in its sociopolitical and cultural

    contexts. Topics include pre-Ottoman Anatolia; frontier society; methods of conquest; centralization of power; classical institutions

    of the land regime and of the central administration; urbanization; religion and literature. Relations with Byzantium, other Islamic

    states, and Europe are examined.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    [History 1878b. Ottoman State and Society II (1550-1920)]

    Catalog Number: 6470

    Cemal Kafadar

    Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4

    Surveys the transformations of the classical Ottoman order in the Middle East and southeastern Europe until the demise of the

    state. Topics include decentralization; social disturbances; the impact of the new world economy and new trade routes; reforms;

    changing relations with Europe; nationalist movements; the 'Eastern Question.' Ethnic structure, rural society, urban popular

    culture, guilds, and family life are also examined. The importance of this era for understanding today's Middle East is stressed.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    [History 1883. The Middle East and Modernity: Conference Course]

    Catalog Number: 2369 Enrollment: Limited to 12.

    Cemal Kafadar

    Half course (spring term). Tu., 1-3. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16

    When and how did Middle Eastern societies become modern? Or postmodern? Or, are they still traditional? In what sense?

    Examines Middle Eastern history since the 16th century in the light of the current literature on the meanings and trajectories of

    modernity. Analyzes the processes of transformation in different spheres of social organization (state, family, etc.) , and cultural

    expression (literature, music, architecture, etc.). Particular attention paid to the Ottoman realm from the "early modern" era

    through the 19th-century reforms. Comparative projects dealing with different parts of the Islamic world and the Balkans will be

    encouraged.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    [History 1884. Introduction to Archival Research in Ottoman History: Proseminar]

    Catalog Number: 4513

    Cemal Kafadar

    Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.

    A survey of archival collections related to Ottoman history. Introduction to the archives of the central government, pious

    endowments, provincial administrations, and court records. Also covers European collections of Ottoman documents and archival

    materials in European languages. Attention given to the standard tools of reference.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

    Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Turkish.

     

    [History 1889. Transmission of Traditional Islamic Learning in the Middle East from the Beginning of Islam to the

    Present]

    Catalog Number: 2155 Enrollment: Limited to 12

    Roy Mottahedeh

    Half course (fall term). W., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8

    A study of the transmission of Islamic learning in the Middle East, principally in the institutions of learning called madrasahs, but

    also in private circles, from the 7th century to the present. Topics include the origins of the study of scripture, the origins of the

    madrasah, permissions to teach, curriculum, methods for examining the accuracy of manuscript copies, the influence of Sufi

    mystical orders in styles and methods of teaching, reaction to the introduction of printing, modern attempts at state control of

    madrasahs.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

    Prerequisite: A course in the history of the Islamic Middle East, premodern or modern.

     

    History 1890b. The Economic and Social History of the Middle East from 1918 to the Present

    Catalog Number: 1249

    Edward Roger Owen

    Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 10, plus one hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12

    A critical overview of the processes of economic growth and transformation in the Middle East from World War I to the present.

    Countries to be studied include Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, the Arab states of the Arabian Peninsula, Israel/Palestine, Iran

    and Turkey.

    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.

     

    [History 2884. Topics in Ottoman Social and Cultural History: Seminar]

    Catalog Number: 3762

    Cemal Kafadar

    Half course (fall term). Th., 3-5 p.m. EXAM GROUP: 17, 18

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

    Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Turkish.

     

    History 2886. Topics in Islamic History

    Catalog Number: 3470

    Roy Mottahedeh

    Half course (spring term). W., 1-3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7

    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.

     

    [History 2887a (formerly History 2887). Debates in the Economic and Social History of the Middle East: Seminar]

    Catalog Number: 1352

    Edward Roger Owen

    Half course (fall term). W., 1-3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7

    Major questions and debates in recent writings on the economic and social transformation of the Middle East, including the use of

    concepts of class, status and sect; the study of popular movements and revolutions; the impact of imperialism and colonialism; and

    the analysis of state/society relations.

    Note: Expected to be given in 2000-01.

     

    [History 2887b. Debates in the Political and Ideological History of the Middle East: Seminar]

    Catalog Number: 4102

    Edward Roger Owen

    Half course (spring term). W., 1-3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7

    Major questions and debates in recent writings on the political and ideological history of the Middle East, including the concepts of

    Orientalism, nationalism, power and authority, and tradition and modernity; revisions of the nationalist narrative; and attempts to

    explore new types of historical writing.

    Note: Expected to be given in 2000-01.

     

    [History 2888. Topics in the History of Central Asia: Proseminar]

    Catalog Number: 7937

    Edward L. Keenan and John S. Schoeberlein-Engel

    Half course (fall term). Th., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17

    Offers a foundation for graduate students studying topics in the history, society, culture, and politics of Central Asia, including the

    former Soviet republics and adjacent areas. The course will simultaneously take up central themes in the contemporary society

    and recent history of Central Asia, while providing the students with a fundamental knowledge of the methods and resources for

    the study of these topics.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00. Knowledge of Russian, Central Asian languages, Turkish or Persian desirable but not

    required.

     

    History 2891. Religion, Law and Misplaced Secularity: Seminar

    Catalog Number: 2084

    Ayesha Jalal (Columbia University)

    Half course (spring term). M., 3-5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9

    Will trace the historical relationship between religion and law in the pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial periods. By

    reconceptualizing the separation of the 'public' and the 'private' sphere as well as secular and religious law, it probes how Indian

    self-perceptions of their religiously informed identities were shaped by the challenge of colonial modernity and in turn influenced

    anti-colonial nationalism as well as post-colonial national ideologies.

     

    [History 1946. The "New Imperialism" in Thought and Practice, 1850-1939: Conference Course]

    Catalog Number: 7488 Enrollment: Limited to 12

    Leroy Vail

    Half course (spring term). Tu., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17

    An examination of the "New Imperialism" that took place in the last three decades of the 19th century. Topics include the

    imperialism of free trade; the rise of racism and Social Darwinism; the scramble for Africa and imperialism in Asia; the

    professionalization of anthropology; colonial romanticism and its literature; critiques of empire.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    History 1952. Comparative Colonialism: Conference Course

    Catalog Number: 6795

    Catherine A. Corman

    Half course (fall term). M., 1-3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7

    An introduction to major themes and thinkers in the history of colonialism, including an examination of the ways different peoples

    approached problems common to colonial encounters.

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    History of Art and Architecture

    History of Art and Architecture 12. Early Islamic Art and Architecture (650-1250)

    Catalog Number: 7236

    David J. Roxburgh

    Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4

    An introductory survey of the architecture, ceramics, metalwork, and arts of the book from Spain to India and Central Asia, during

    the period between the rise of Islam and Mongol conquests. Focusing on the patronage of ruling elites in principal urban centers,

    the architecture and material culture of the Islamic world will be approached through a variety of contexts: cultural, political,

    socio-economic, and aesthetic.

    Note: This survey complements Fine Arts 12d: Introduction to Later Islamic Art and Architecture (1250-1800).

     

    [History of Art and Architecture 12d. Introduction to Later Islamic Art and Architecture (1250-1800)]

    Catalog Number: 3027

    Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar

    Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13

    An introductory survey of the masterpieces of later Islamic art and architecture from the Mongol conquests in the early 13th

    century to the modern era. Architectural monuments, the applied arts, and the arts of the book from Spain to the borders of China

    will be treated in their cultural, political, socio-economic, and aesthetic contexts. The visual culture of the Islamic world will be

    analyzed within a dynastic perspective, highlighting the goals of patrons belonging to ruling elites.

    Note: Expected to be given in 2000-01.

     

    [History of Art and Architecture 126x. Art of the House of Tamerlane (1370-1506)]

    Catalog Number: 0174

    David J. Roxburgh

    Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4

    Covers the art and architecture sponsored by Tamerlane and his descendants in Iran and Transoxiana in the years between

    Tamerlane's campaigns and the demise of political power. Lectures alternate between the study of media (arranged

    chronologically), and a thematic treatment of critical issues (for example: patronage as a means of legitimation and cultural

    assimilation; exploitation of steppe/sown sources of power and prestige; changes in socioeconomic structure; regional/metropolitan

    architectural traditions; the formation of a canonical visual idiom; and the patronage of royal women). A wealth of recent literature

    and primary sources made available in translation will be used.

    Note: Expected to be given in 2000-01.

     

    History of Art and Architecture 129. Islamic Pilgrimage

    Catalog Number: 1195 Enrollment: Limited to 12

    David J. Roxburgh

    Half course (fall term). Tu., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17

    Examines Islamic pilgrimage, worship, and ceremonial practices through architectural and urban settings and the pilgrim's material

    appurtenances. Mecca, Medina, and Jerusalem provide the main focus, but also considered are the development of shrines and

    shrine complexes throughout Iran, Egypt, and North Africa. Additional themes include the imaging of holy places, and the

    illustration of hagiographical and eschatological texts.

     

    [History of Art and Architecture 221. Visual Encounters: Artistic Relations between Europe and the Islamic World]

    Catalog Number: 8322 Enrollment: Limited to 12

    Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar and David J. Roxburgh

    Half course (spring term). W., 1-3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7

    The impact of European art on Islamic visual culture is explored in aesthetic, cultural, scientific and philosophical terms to

    understand the receptivity to Western architecture and imagery. Focusing on 15th through 18th century material, the seminar

    addresses the nature of interaction and reaction. Projects on earlier and later periods encouraged.

    Note: Expected to be given in 2000-01.

     

    History of Art and Architecture 229. Persian Painting (14th-17th Centuries): Between Figuration and Abstraction

    Catalog Number: 9236 Enrollment: Limited to 12

    David J. Roxburgh

    Half course (spring term). M., 3-5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9

    Fundamental questions are sidestepped in the study of Persian "miniature" painting (style; authorship; figuration; changing

    functions of painting within the shifting context of the book), in favor of taxonomic approaches. Seminar examines scholarly

    definitions of the visual tradition's salient features and explores tensions between these and ones contemporary to production.

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    Music

    [Music 206r. Research Methods in Ethnomusicology: Seminar]

    Catalog Number: 6891

    Kay Kaufman Shelemay

    Half course (spring term). W., 1-3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7

    The transmission of culture: oral, aural, and written. Exploration of transmission from an ethnomusicological perspective, including

    transmission processes, changing technologies, and cultural settings. Focus on Middle Eastern musical traditions.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

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    Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

    [Islamic Civilizations 120. The City in North African History]

    Catalog Number: 0686

    Susan G. Miller

    Half course (spring term). Th., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17

    A survey of the city in Maghribi history from 1500 to the present, with the emphasis on the interaction of urban form and social

    praxis-the city as a religious space, performance/ritual space, domestic and monumental space. Topics include: the Islamic city

    debate; city/state relations; "traditional" society and municipal authority; the Maghribi city through Western eyes; the politics of

    colonial design; modernity and urban change; the city and memory; the post-colonial city in popular literature.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

     

    Islamic Civilizations 121. North Africa, 1500 to the Present

    Catalog Number: 6224

    Susan G. Miller

    Half course (spring term). Th., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17

    An initiation to North African (Maghribi) history, surveying the evolution of relations between state and society from the late

    medieval period to the present and emphasizing the specificity of the North African experience. Topics include: Maghribi space

    and society in the medieval literature; saint worship and sultanic authority; society viewed through the literature of captivity; the

    19th century encounter with the West; race and caste in the colonial era; the Algerian revolution in essay, film and fiction;

    post-colonial political change.

    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.

     

    [Islamic Civilizations 124. Central Asian Culture and Society]

    Catalog Number: 3927 Enrollment: Limited.

    John S. Schoeberlein-Engel

    Half course (spring term). W., 2-4, and an additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8

    The course explores the diversity and continuity in contemporary Central Asian culture and society and their historical roots. After

    building a basis of knowledge of the pre- and early-modern history of the region and of its contemporary political context and

    institutions, the course will approach Central Asian culture, social structure and everyday life from a variety of angles. These will

    include perspectives available in various types of literature on the region, including the travel accounts of travelers to the region

    from pre-modern to recent time, indigenous literary folklore traditions, 19th-century orientalist scholarship, and contemporary

    scholarly approaches. The course will draw on ethnographic accounts to develop a rich picture of the social meaning and cultural

    context of ways of life (from the historical caravan trade and pastoral nomadism to contemporary collective farm and urban life),

    community rituals, social institutions, religious practices, moral sensibilities and aesthetic traditions.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00. Intended primarily for advanced undergraduates and graduate students; some background

    in the Near East and/or the former Soviet Union desirable.

     

    Islamic Civilizations 125. History and Culture of Islamic Peoples of the Former Soviet Union

    Catalog Number: 0646 Enrollment: Limited.

    John S. Schoeberlein-Engel

    Half course (spring term). W., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8

    Themes in the history of cultural change, from prior to Russian expansion into Muslim lands until the post-Soviet period. The

    course encompasses territories falling under Russian dominion by the 19th century that are inhabited by peoples which are

    culturally more akin to Asia and the Islamic Middle East than to Europe: Central Asia, the Caucasus, and southern Russia.

    Themes include the background of Iranian, Turkic and Islamic culture, problems of induced cultural change

    (Russification/Europeanization/modernization), social transformation under the establishment and dissolution of Russian rule and

    the Communist system, the institutionalization of national identities, and changing family and community organization.

    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00. Intended primarily for graduates and advanced undergraduates; some background in the

    Near East and/or the Soviet Union desirable.

     

    Islamic Civilizations 145 (formerly Arabic 145). Islamic Philosophy and Theology

    Catalog Number: 0292

    Robert Wisnovsky

    Half course (fall term). W., 3-5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9

    An introduction to some of the philosophical and theological problems that have preoccupied Muslim intellectuals from the 8th

    century AD to the present. Topics to be covered include theodicy and God's attributes, politics and prophecy, psychology and

    epistemology, natural philosophy and metaphysics. Points of conflict between philosophers and theologians will be examined in

    detail.

    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.

     

    *Islamic Civilizations 200a. Approaches to Islamic Studies: Proseminar

    Catalog Number: 5918

    Edward Roger Owen

    Half course (fall term). M., 4-6. EXAM GROUP: 18

    Interdisciplinary introduction for all first-year graduate students in Islamic subjects. Explores selected "classic" works and

    problems in diverse fields basic to Islamic studies. Format involves biweekly discussion meetings with rotating guest faculty

    resource persons in Islamic subjects.

     

    *Islamic Civilizations 300. Reading and Research in Islamic Civilizations

    Catalog Number: 1963

    Ali S. Asani 7739, William A. Graham, Jr. 4156, Wolfhart P. Heinrichs 4988 (on leave 1998-99), Wheeler M. Thackston,

    Jr. 4004, and Robert Wisnovsky 2229

     

    *Islamic Civilizations 350. Reading and Research in Ottoman History and Literature

    Catalog Number: 4084

    Sinasi Tekin 2353

     

    Armenian Studies 100. Armenian Epic

    Catalog Number: 2576

    James R. Russell

    Half course (fall term). Tu., 6-7:30. EXAM GROUP: 18

    Reading in translation of The Wild Men of Sasun, with analysis of native historical and mythological sources, and thematic

    comparison to epic poetry of the neighboring Iranians (Ossetic Narts, Persian Shah-nameh, Kurdish epic songs), Turks (Dede

    Korkut), and Greeks (Digenes Akrites).

    Note: Expected to be omitted in 1999-00.

     

    [Turkish A. Elementary Modern Turkish]

    Catalog Number: 2527

    Sinasi Tekin and assistant

    Full course (indivisible). M., through F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12

    Emphasis on all aspects of Turkish grammar toward developing a solid foundation for speaking, listening, reading, writing, and

    vocabulary skills.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00. Not open to auditors.

     

    Turkish 120a. Intermediate Turkish I

    Catalog Number: 4009

    Sinasi Tekin and assistant

    Half course (fall term). M., through F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2, 11

    Emphasis on complex sentence structure and building communicative competence in describing events and expressing ideas

    through exercises in reading, writing, and speaking.

    Note: Not open to auditors.

    Prerequisite: Turkish A or equivalent.

     

    Turkish 120b. Intermediate Turkish II

    Catalog Number: 1394

    Sinasi Tekin and assistant

    Half course (spring term). M., through F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2, 11

    Studies in argumentative and literary prose.

    Note: Not open to auditors.

    Prerequisite: Turkish 120a or equivalent.

     

    Turkish 121a (formerly Turkish 121). Elementary Uzbek

    Catalog Number: 3006

    Wheeler M. Thackston, Jr. and assistant

    Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged; four meetings per week.

    Introduction to conversational and literary Uzbek. Overview of the grammar, intensive practice of the spoken language, and

    reading of contemporary texts.

    Note: Some knowledge of Modern Turkish or other Turkic language helpful but not required.

     

    Turkish 121b. Elementary Uzbek

    Catalog Number: 7303

    Wheeler M. Thackston, Jr. and assistant

    Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged; four meetings per week.

    Continuation of Turkish 121a.

    Note: Some knowledge of Modern Turkish or other Turkic language helpful but not required.

     

    Turkish 130a. Advanced Turkish I

    Catalog Number: 6964

    Sinasi Tekin and assistant

    Half course (fall term). M., through F., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4, 13

    Gaining and improving advanced language skills in Modern Turkish through reading, writing, listening, and speaking with special

    emphasis on the proper usage of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions.

    Note: Not open to auditors.

    Prerequisite: Turkish 120b or equivalent.

     

    Turkish 130b. Advanced Turkish II

    Catalog Number: 4354

    Sinasi Tekin and assistant

    Half course (spring term). M., through F., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4, 13

    Studies in literary and idiomatic prose through readings, discussions, and writing of short analytical papers.

    Note: Not open to auditors.

    Prerequisite: Turkish 130a or equivalent.

     

    Turkish 140. Introduction to Ottoman

    Catalog Number: 1906

    Sinasi Tekin

    Full course. Th., at 2, M., 2-5. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8, 9, 16

    Introduction to basic orthographic conventions and grammatical characteristics of Ottoman Turkish through readings in printed

    selections from the 19th and 20th centuries, and exercises on techniques.

    Prerequisite: Turkish A; and one year of Arabic or Persian desirable.

     

    Turkish 142. Introduction to Ottoman Palaeography and Diplomatic Correspondence

    Catalog Number: 0239

    Sinasi Tekin

    Full course. Th., 2-4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17

    Calligraphic, orthographic, and stylistic characteristics of Ottoman legal and diplomatic correspondence through reading and

    analysis of primary sources.

    Prerequisite: Turkish 140 or equivalent.

     

    Turkish 146. Old Turkish

    Catalog Number: 2929

    Sinasi Tekin

    Full course. W., 1-4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8

    Writing and structure of Old Turkish through readings in Orkhon inscriptions and Old Uyghur Buddhist and Manichaean texts.

    Prerequisite: Knowledge of one Turkish language.

     

    Turkish 147a. Advanced Uzbek

    Catalog Number: 3846

    Wheeler M. Thackston, Jr. and assistant

    Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.

     

    Turkish 147b. Advanced Uzbek

    Catalog Number: 4820

    Wheeler M. Thackston, Jr. and assistant

    Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.

    Continuation of Turkish 147a.

     

    [Turkish 148a. Chaghatay: Readings in Literary Sources]

    Catalog Number: 1712

    Wheeler M. Thackston, Jr.

    Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.

    Readings in literary and historical sources from the 15th and 16th centuries, including Mir Ali-Sher Navai and the Baburnama.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00.

    Prerequisite: Knowledge of elementary Turkish and/or Persian.

     

    Turkish 148b. Chaghatay: Poetry

    Catalog Number: 6843

    Sinasi Tekin and assistant

    Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12, and additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 14

    Language and style of Chagatay poetry through selected readings from the post-Karakhanid period until the 16th century.

    Prerequisite: Turkish A, Persian A, or equivalents.

     

    [Turkish 149. Introduction to Modern Turkish Literature]

    Catalog Number: 2156

    F. Engin Sezer and assistant

    Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12. EXAM GROUP: 14

    A survey of 20th-century Modern Turkish poetry and prose through selected readings of novels, short stories and poetry in Turkish

    and/or in translation. Emphasis on both literary appreciation and themes such as the impact of modernization and social change on

    new forms and content.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00. Some knowledge of Turkish is helpful but not necessary.

     

    Turkish 240. Readings in Ottoman Sources

    Catalog Number: 2180

    Sinasi Tekin and assistant

    Full course (indivisible). M., 11-2. EXAM GROUP: 4, 5, 6

    Codicological analysis of handwritten documents from the 13th to the 18th century in photocopies and in the originals from a

    private collection. Analysis of textual styles of different genres.

    Prerequisite: Turkish 140 or equivalent.

     

    Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

     

    *Turkish 300 (formerly *Turkish 385 and *Turkic 385). Turkish Languages and Literatures

    Catalog Number: 7702

    F. Engin Sezer 2833 (on leave 1998-99) and Sinasi Tekin 2353

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    The Study of Religion

    [Religion 1555. Introduction to Islamic Mysticism: The Sufi Tradition]

    Catalog Number: 3830

    Ali S. Asani

    Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 12. EXAM GROUP: 5

    Introductory survey of Sufism, focusing on its fundamental concepts, ritual practices, institutions, and its impact on literary and

    sociopolitical life in different regions of the Islamic world.

    Note: Expected to be given in 1999-00. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3620.

    Prerequisite: Religion 1550 or equivalent helpful but not essential.

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    Slavic Languages and Literatures

    *Slavic 119. Contemporary Issues: Nationalities of the Former Soviet Union

    Catalog Number: 0636

    Alexander Babyonyshev

    Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3

    The former Soviet Union as a multinational state, seen in its historical development and in the light of recent events. Questions of

    national identity and their political and academic consequences. Introduction to related demographic issues. Reading, discussion,

    composition, and supplementary written work, as needed.

    Note: No auditors permitted. May not be taken Pass/Fail.

    Prerequisite: Slavic 102 and 103 or Slavic 111a, 111b, 112, or 120.

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